March Presentation Lip Reading Summary

Those who attended our March chapter meeting enjoyed a great presentation about what is lip reading, how it can help us in noisy situations and training opportunities. And a special thank you to Ed Auer, Ph. D. and Nicole Jordan, Au.D. to take time out of their Saturday morning to present to us.

Some meeting notes to share:

There is a wonderful opportunity to participate in the speech recognition study. To learn more go to https://seehear.us/study/.

You may also reach out Ed Auer, Ph.D., with any questions at eauer@gwu.edu.

Clear masks options to review and purchase:

Watch the presentation below.

Discover Your Voice with a Professional Vocal Artist!

USC Here, My Voice Woman singing

Here, My Voice 2: Supporting the Power of Voice of Hard of Hearing People

Are you a cochlear implant or hearing aid user and interested in receiving personalized voice lessons with a professional vocal artist?

USC’s “Here, My Voice” program is looking for adults with hearing loss for the study focusing on improving vocal confidence and joy of self-expression. Participants can choose to work on vocal expressions such as singing and spoken words. The lessons will be held over Zoom or in-person for one hour per week over a 12 week period. No prior music or singing experience is required. Individual voice lessons are provided to participants at no cost to them. If you agree to participate, you will be asked to fill out surveys and be part of individual interviews. Data will be anonymously collected. You will receive a $100 gift card as a token of gratitude for participating. Your participation is voluntary and you can withdraw from the study at any time.

Please contact Juri Hwang by clicking the Learn More! button below or email at jurihwan@usc.edu for more information.

May 22 Finding Balance Meeting Recap

Alaina Bassett

Dr. Alaina Bassett

A big thank you to Dr. Alaina Bassett for a very engaging and informative presentation of the vestibular system. Our balance system is unique and is made up of many different systems working in concert to give us the ability to understand and navigate our surroundings.

Dr. Bassett started off her presentation discussing our balance system made up of the vestibular, visual and somatosensory systems. The anatomy and physiology of our inner ear and the particular functions each part plays in our hearing were discussed in-depth. Various testing techniques to understand and evaluate balance was shared to give the audience a better feel of what they should expect should they want to be tested.

» Read more

A March 27 Chapter Meeting Not to Miss!

Hearing Loss Challenges Don’t Stop at the Ears

Join us for what should be a fascinating and engaging presentation about hearing loss and new hope with up-and-coming treatment options.

Date: Saturday, March 27
Time: 10 a.m. (PT)
Speaker: Dr. Nancy Tye-Murray (bio)
Duration: 90 minutes

Hearing loss challenges don’t stop at the ears. Co-morbidities of hearing loss include social isolation and loneliness, depression, increased risk of falls, and cognitive decline and related dementias.

In our upcoming Chapter meeting, Dr. Nancy Tye-Murray will describe how digital therapeutics are changing the face of healthcare, and then present an example of how digital therapeutics may be used to treat hearing loss and its downstream effects.

Nancy Tye-Murray, PhD., is a Professor of otolaryngology-head & neck surgery at Washington University School of Medicine.

The Reality of Listening Fatigue in a World of Masks

Man with mask

From hearinglikeme.com—The concept of listening fatigue has been around for quite some time; but could it be even more prevalent in a world of face masks? The short answer is—absolutely—for both those with hearing loss and those without.

Read more »

For more information on hearing and masks, visit the Hearing Loss Association of America resources page.

Watch our webinar, Face Masks and Hearing Loss: Practical Tips and Strategieshere.

Robert Mueller Hard of Hearing? Another Challenge For Older Workers

Much has been said regarding Robert Mueller’s communication during his testimony. Was there an unknown healthy issue that laid question to his ability to clearly promote a sense of confidence in his testimony or was there something else? A term called “normal cognitive aging” is very real and deals with the way older adults process information that can be especially true for those with hearing loss. In case you haven’t seen it already, check out the article discussing this in more detail below.

Challenges hard of hearing older workers face.

The Latest in Car Technology for People With Hearing Loss

Hyundai assistive technology for hard of hearingHyundai Motor Company is leading the effort to re-innovate how those hard of hearing or deaf can get all the important stimulus when driving compared to those with normal hearing. Thanks to Audio-Visual Conversion (AVC) and Audio-Tactile Conversion (ATC) assist driving systems, visual and touch clues can be provided to the driver to alert when situations occur that would normally be difficult for those with hearing challenges to immediately notice. Learn more about what is current being developed and is in store toward the future!

Unlocking the World of Sound for Deaf Children

Children and hearingIt’s now more important than ever to unlock the potential of children by identifying and treating their hearing loss as soon as realized. Jane R. Madell, a pediatric audiology consultant and speech-language pathologist in Brooklyn, N.Y., shares eye-opening findings revolving around how beneficial it is to treat children with hearing loss, no matter how severe, as early as possible.

Check out this amazing and rewarding story here from the NY Times.

1 2